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Why the writing’s on the wall for Berlin’s murals

Tourists heading to Berlin for a culture fix this spring will not have to pay an entrance fee to a gallery to view the German capital’s best-kept art secret.

On the corner of Kurfürstenstrasse and Budapester Strasse, just across from the Berlin aquarium, visitors can admire a rarely seen black and white work by the pop art pioneer Eduardo Paolozzi, lost to the world for three decades until its re-emergence earlier this year.

The exhibition will not be accepting offers from willing buyers, however – mainly because the canvas is a 990 sq metre concrete wall – and in any case is due to shut down permanently over the next few months.

Painted on the side of a building in 1976 to mark the end of the Scottish artist’s one-year stay in Berlin, the mural was soon covered up by banking offices that are currently being demolished, thus briefly revealing its retro-futuristic curves just as a smaller replica of the same work is on display at the Berlinische Galerie on the other side of the city. Read more

2018-10-29T09:41:17+00:00